Visiting Scholars and Fellows

 

   
 

Dr Micaela Sinibaldi
CBRL Research Fellow (micaela.sinibaldi@gmail.com)

Micaela Sinibaldi is a Medieval Archaeologist specialising in the material culture of the Middle East. For her current CBRL fellowship, she is researching on the subject of Islamic-period pottery in Petra, its role in understanding settlement in the region and its chronologically significant aspects. This phase of research follows her work on comparative studies on several Islamic-period assemblages and on the development of a local chronology based on both typological and scientific analysis and stratigraphy. The project aims at contributing to bridge an important gap, both chronological (the one concerning the later historical periods in Petra), and territorial (the one concerning the significance of the connection of the Petra Valley with its hinterland and neighboring regions).

Micaela holds a PhD from Cardiff University, where she submitted a thesis entitled Settlement in Crusader Transjordan, 1100-1189 (2014); she has been a post-doctoral fellow at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany (2014/2015). She currently directs the CBRL-affiliated Islamic Bayda Project in Petra and has recently co-edited the volume Crusader Landscapes in the Medieval Levant: the Archaeology and History of the Latin East (2016).

Dr Sarah Elliott
CBRL Research Fellow (selliott735@gmail.com)

Sarah Elliott works as an environmental archaeologist specialising in phytolith analysis, micromorphology, portable x-ray fluorescence, spherulite analysis (including smear slide analysis) and ethnoarchaeology. She holds a BA in Ancient History and Archaeology and an MSc in Geoarchaeology from the University of Reading. Her research focuses on the Neolithic of the Near East and her PhD investigated an integrated multi-scalar and multi-proxy approach to the identification and analysis of ancient faecal material.

As part of the CZAP project she investigated early animal management and secondary product use in Iraq and Iran through the identification of animal penning and microscopic signature of dung in Neolithic villages. She has also helped develop an ethnoarchaeological project investigating animal husbandry in Iraqi Kurdistan with a range of animal, plant and environmental data. In 2014-15 she worked as a Research Assistant on the INEA Project co-directed by Bournemouth University and the CBRL.The aim of the project was to integrate ethnographic investigation with phytolith and geochemical methods to identify activity areas and construction materials within settlements.

During here fellowship at the CBRL she will develop ethnoarchaeological projects. She will collect a modern dung reference collection in Jordan from a range of species, vegetation zones and in different seasons.  She will also collect additional data which will be analysed and then compared against the INEA results.

Piotr Jacobsson
CBRL Research Fellow (p.jacobsson.1@research.gla.ac.uk)

Piotr is an archaeologist specializing in the Bayesian analysis of radiocarbon dates – a process that makes it possible to use 14C determinations to derive accurate estimates of the timing and duration of events and processes, such as the onset of activity in a given location, or the time elapsed between two occupation periods. During his CBRL fellowship, Piotr will be evaluating the potential of the published 14C evidence for evaluating the synchronicity of changes in the earlier stages of the Neolithic, with a special focus on the chronological relationship between Cyprus and the south-west Asian mainland. The project will also involve the identification of the key technical challenges for the improvement of Neolithic chronologies and the development of further dating projects. Piotr holds a Scottish MA and an MSc from the University of Edinburgh, and he did a PhD on the radiocarbon wiggle-match dating technique at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC). His other research interests include the role of statistics within archaeology and the epistemology of archaeological inference. 

Alex Bellem

Dr Alex Bellem is a linguist specialising in comparative and theoretical phonology and phonetics, and focusing mainly on language varieties of the Middle East, particularly Arabic dialects. She has a PhD in linguistics from SOAS, University of London. From 2008–10, she held a Post-Doctoral Fellowship with the CBRL, based in Jordan and then Syria as Research Director (Syria). She has also worked as a Pronunciation Linguist in the BBC, for whom she continues to provide expertise on Arabic. Following a lectureship in linguistics at the University of Salford, she now holds a lectureship in Arabic in the University of Durham. Her research interests centre on the ‘emphatic’ consonants of the Semitic languages, on resonance and laryngeal categories in phonology, and on Arabic linguistics more broadly, including issues of variation. She has also worked on phonological systems of North-East Caucasian (Nakh-Daghestanian) languages, and is collaborating on the phonetics, phonology and documentation of Modern South Arabian languages, as well as on a comparative study of Literary Mixed Arabic.

In 2016 Alex will spend 3 months as a Senior Visiting Fellow at the British Institute, Amman, funded by a CBRL award, to set up a collaborative project on rural dialects, working with Dr Carol Palmer. The CBRL fellowship will constitute the initial phase of the Disappearing Dialects? Arabic and Traditional Lifestyles of the Rural North, Centre and South of Jordan project, which aims to investigate, document and analyse three varieties of rural Jordanian Arabic, focusing on dialect variation and women’s speech within the context of disappearing rural traditions.

Allison Spencer Hartnett
CBRL Research Scholar ( allison.hartnett@politics.ox.ac.uk)

Allison Spencer Hartnett is a political scientist working on the political economy of redistribution and inequality in the MENA region. A DPhil candidate in Politics at the University of Oxford, her current research focuses on the relationship between Jordanian agricultural and redistributive politics in rural areas. Allison holds a Masters from the University of Oxford in Modern Middle Eastern Studies where her dissertation mapped formal and informal determinants of Jordanian water sector reform. Allison is the vice-chairperson of the Oxford Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Studies Forum and worked as an international dispute resolution specialist and technical consultant across the MENA region. She teaches Middle East politics and political science at the University of Oxford as a departmental tutor and taught Arabic through the Altair Institute, an intercultural dialogue initiative Allison founded and led from 2009 to 2012 in Richmond, Virginia, USA. Her CBRL Scholarship is hosted by the British Institute in Amman.

 

Lauren Hales
Qasid Scholar (hales.laurenj@gmail.com)

Lauren is the 2016 Autumn Qasid Scholar. She holds a BA in Politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and an MPhil in Modern Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on everyday technologies in urban spaces in the Arab world, looking particularly at social performances of modernity and the anthropology of space and time. She has previously conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Beirut on automobility, its infrastructures and everyday practices, and its relationship to neoliberal-sectarianism in post-war Lebanon. Lauren is now in Amman focusing on improving her Arabic, and volunteering with an organisation providing psychosocial support to child refugees in Jordan, before embarking on doctoral study.

 

Past CBRL Fellows and Scholars at the British Insitute in Amman include:

 

Dr Jamie AllinsonDr Francesca Burke, Dr Lucy Bennison-ChapmanDr Jennie Bradbury, Dr Michael G. Brown, Dr Paul Burtenshaw, Alison Damick, Dr Kay DickinsonDr Christopher HarkerShazia Jagot, Yusuke KawamuraProf. Christopher KnüselDr Phil LeechDr Ebtihal MahadeenDr Lisa MaherDr Simon Mills, Dr Marta Pietrobelli, Dr Claire Rambeau, Zoe-Louise Robinson, Dr Jehan Saleh, Stefan L. Smith, Dr Hanan Toukan, Dr Lucy WadesonDr Andrea Zerbini, Dr Tiffany Chezum, Reema Salha Fadda, Dr Vanessa Iaria, Dr Marlena Whiting.

Past British Institute Amman - Qasid Arabic Institute Scholars:

Craig Browne, Rachel Dryden, John Hayhurst, Dr Ahmad Khan, Dr Kevin James Lewis, Caelum Moffatt, Beckie Ryan, Claire Thong, Matthew Vickery, Jonathan Peters, Guy Eyre, Olivia Mason.

Affiliated Projects:

Lauren is the 2016 Autumn Qasid Scholar. She holds a BA in Politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and an MPhil in Modern Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on everyday technologies in urban spaces in the Arab world, looking particularly at social performances of modernity and the anthropology of space and time. She has previously conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Beirut on automobility, its infrastructures and everyday practices, and its relationship to neoliberal-sectarianism in post-war Lebanon. Lauren is now in Amman focusing on improving her Arabic, and volunteering with an organisation providing psychosocial support to child refugees in Jordan, before embarking on doctoral study.